A Peek at ClipperView

Jan 15, 2018 11:54:17 AM EST

We are again on the road this month, presenting our six-month proprietary outlook for global oil and products, driven by the trends we see in our ClipperData. We will be covering various commodities, from crude oil to fuel oil, from gasoline to LPG and beyond, as well as emerging trends we see across various geographies, including Europe, Asia and the Americas.

Below are a couple of charts from the presentation, giving a peek into what we will be discussing in London, Houston and New York in the coming weeks.

One area of focus will be the changing dynamics of the U.S. crude market. The chart below shows how the API of monthly waterborne crude imports into the US Atlantic Coast has been getting progressively lighter.  

As less crude by rail from Bakken has made its way to Atlantic Coast refiners in recent years due to unfavorable economics, the need for light, sweet crude has increasingly been met by West African (WAF) and North African (NAF) imports. Think: Nigeria, Angola, Algeria and Libya.  

While Atlantic Coast waterborne imports rose by 6 percent in 2017, WAF and NAF grades increased by a rampant 32 percent. Just over three-quarters of WAF / NAF barrels delivered to the Atlantic Coast in 2017 had an API of 33 or higher (putting them into the 'light crude' bucket). 

As illustrated below, crude imports into the Atlantic Coast had an average API of 30 for much of 2015, with a sulfur content of over 1 percent. Fast forward to 2017, and imports have become both lighter and sweeter. Imports saw an average monthly API as high as 37 last year, while sulfur content has halved to be much closer to 0.5 percent.  East Coast imports by API.jpg

New Call-to-action

Another theme we will discuss at the latest round of ClipperViews is how the Asian gasoline market is becoming much more insular. 

The chart below shows the rise in internal flows in Asia (i.e., domestic flows), as well as increasing gasoline imports and exports over the last three years. 

While internal flows barely grew in 2015, waterborne imports were up over 12 percent. But in 2016, internal flows increased 14 percent, before rising by 16 percent last year. For the same two years, imports rose 14 percent in 2016, but only 1 percent last year, while the pace of rising exports also slowed from 8 percent in 2016 to just under 2 percent in 2017.

The key takeaway? Asia is increasingly meeting its own needs, using domestic production of gasoline to offset rising demand, dialing back on its exports in the process. With this transition underway, Asian nations are also seeing a lesser need to ramp up imports. Asia appears to be becoming more self sufficient, at least from a gasoline perspective.

We do hope you will join us at one of our ClipperViews in the coming weeks. There'll be more proprietary insights than you can shake a stick at.

Asia gasoline flows.jpg

About the Author

Matt Smith

deciphers and distills what is most relevant across the energy complex into cohesive and pithy knowledge you can use. The belly laugh is a bonus.

Subscribe to Email Updates